Deborah Parker, seen above with her son, Wetuah Dewey, is a member of the Tulalip Tribes. (Photo by Nancy Bleck, Slangy Sp’ak’wus)

Indigenizing Social Justice: Sexual Assault Activism and Human Rights

Tuesday, April 16
Noon-1:30 p.m.
Monroe 205
Keynote and Q&A

Take a journey with Social Activist Deborah Parker as we begin from a place of hope and move toward action. Learn how Ms. Parker inspired a nation. 

Food and beverages for this event are provided by our friends in Health, Wellness, and Prevention Services.

Activating our Inner Voices to Create Social Change

Tuesday, April 16
2-3 p.m.
Monroe 205

Learn how to find and use your inner voice and engage in positive change to create a more just world together. Each participant will look within to find this source of action.

About Deborah Parker

Deborah Parker is a member of the Tulalip Tribes where she served as Vice Chair of her Council. During her tenure as Vice Chair, Deborah became a nationally recognized advocate and activist for the rights of women, children and Indigenous Nations. She played a prominent role in the passage of the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) and helped lead other critical legislation needed to advance education, social justice, environmental protections and foreign policy. 

Deborah currently serves as the Vice Chair of the National Our Revolution Board and is a Board of Trustee for the National Indigenous Women’s Resource Center (NIWRC). 

Deborah is the recipient of numerous awards including: Enduring Spirit Award from the Native Action Network (2010), National Indian Education Parent of the Year (2011), Parent of the Year by the Washington State Indian Education Association (2011), Pearl Capoeman-Baller Civic Participation Award (2012), Senator Patty Murray’s Golden Tennis Shoe Award Honoree (2013), Indian Country Media Network Hall of Fame Award (2013), Awarded the White House “Champion of Change” Award (2013), Center for Democracy: Named Top Ten Women in Business:  Woman of the Year Award at Governor’s Mansion, Olympia, WA (2014), and the Snohomish County Human Rights Award (2016).