EWU’s College of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics’ (CSTEM) 100 Women Strong program has been recognized as one of the “Inspiring Programs in STEM” for 2020 by Insight into Diversity magazine.  

Launched last fall, the 100 Women Strong program is dedicated to increasing representation of women in the fields of computer science and engineering by recruiting, retaining, and rewarding female students who pursue degrees in these areas. CSTEM will provide mentoring, scholarships and leadership development to help recruit and empower EWU women students.


The initiative comes at a time when STEM-related jobs are increasing nationwide. Industry experts, however, acknowledge there is a shortage of female STEM students in the classrooms and in the field. Fewer than 20 percent of computer science and engineering majors across the country are women – the number is half that at Eastern – which limits these students’ access to some of the nation’s fastest growing and most lucrative careers.

The award reflects Eastern’s commitment to recognizing, supporting and increasing the diversity, equity and inclusion of the student body.

“It is especially appropriate that we learn about and celebrate this honor on the 100th anniversary of the ratification of the 19th Amendment,” says David Bowman, dean of CSTEM at EWU. “Although we have come far in 100 years, we still have a very long way to go. I’m incredibly proud of the steps we are taking to continue the fight for equity in STEM for Women.”

Bowman commended the work of several people for launching and sustaining the initiative, including current project leader Jackie Coomes, interim associate dean of CSTEM, and former associate dean Leslie Cornick, who envisioned and started the 100 Women Strong project.

Jonathan Anderson, dean of the College of Social Sciences, nominated 100 Women Strong for the award.  You can view the award citation on page 50 of the latest issue of Insight into Diversity magazine.

Shannon Kellam, ’19, received her bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering. While at EWU, she helped build a 3D-printed prosthetic arm for Spokane fifth grader Isaiah Strom. Kellam now works at Lamb Weston as an associate engineer.

If you are interested in supporting the College of Science, Technology, Engineering and Math, which includes programs like 100 Women Strong, please visit our giving webpage.